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Photo Gallery of Vegetable Problems – Pepper


General Pepper Disease and Pest Management

Diseases

Gray Mold

Insect/Mite Pests

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Flea beetle Tomato hornworm

Parasitic Plants

Field dodder

Abiotic Problems Common to Pepper

Blossom end rot Vivipary

(Click on photo to enlarge)

General Pepper Disease and Pest Management

Bacterial spot damages Michigan peppers, Spring and summer rains favor disease; coppers can help but not cure bacterial spot on peppers. Mary Hausbeck, Michigan State University.

Pepper & Eggplant Disease Guide – A Practical Guide for Seedsmen, Growers and Agricultural Advisors. Published by Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Inc.’s Plant Health Department.

Diseases

Disease: Gray mold
Pathogen: Botrytis cinerea

Photo Source: Photographer – Sharon Collman
Submitted by Jenny Glass

On-Line Resources:

Pepper Diseases: Gray Mold: Botrytis cinerea, AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center.

Insect/Mite Pests


Disease: Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB)
Latin binomial: Halyomorpha halys
Host crops: Very wide host range including Oregon berry, grape, tree fruits, hazelnuts, vegetables including pepper, ornamentals, etc.

Photo Source: Nik Wimann, Oregon State University
Symptoms of feeding injury on pepper fruit from the brown marmorated stink bug.
Photo Source: Nik Wimann, Oregon State University Photo Source: Todd Murray, Washington State University Skamania County Extension Photo Source: Peter Shearer, Oregon State University Entomologist
Brown marmorated stink bugs (immatures and adults) feeding on pepper fruit.
Photo Source: Peter Shearer, Oregon State University Entomologist

On-Line Resources:

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Oregon, Oregon State University

Pest Watch: brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet FS0079E

Pest Alert: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, A quick ID guide from the Oregon Department of Agriculture

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB).


Common name: Flea beetle
Latin binomial: Pictured is the western potato flea beetle, Epitrix subcrinita, but the tuber flea beetle, Epitrix tuberis, may also damage foliage.
Host crops: Eggplant, pepper, potato, and tomato.

Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

On-Line Resources:

Potato Flea Beetles: Biology and Control. Washington State University Extension Bulletin 1198E.

Potato Flea Beetles. Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Western Potato Flea Beetle Epitrix subcrinita, Tuber Flea Beetle Epitrix tuberis

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Chapter: Irish Potatoes, Section: Flea Beetle to Grasshopper.

Vegetables: Pepper, Eggplant: Flea beetles. Washington State University Hortsense.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Flea beetle.


Common name (of damaging stage): Tomato hornworm
Latin binomial: Manduca quinquemaculata
Host crops: Pepper, eggplantpotato, and tomato.

Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

On-Line Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Washington State Chapter: Vegetables, Section: Tomato Part2: Fleabeetle to Wireworm.

Vegetables: Tomato: Tomato hornworm. Washington State University Hortsense.

UC Pest Management Guidelines: Tomato Hornworms. UC IPM Online, University of California.

Parasitic Plants


Common nameField dodder
Latin binomialCuscuta spp.
Host Crops: Bean, beet, carrot, onion, pepper, potato, tomato, and many other crops (not only vegetables)

Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

On-Line Resources:

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Field dodder.

Abiotic Problems Common to Pepper


Problem: Blossom end rot
Cause: Calcium deficiency resulting from various environmental conditions and management practices, e.g., inadequate Ca in the soil, inconsistent water as a result of alternating wet and dry periods that decrease Ca uptake by plants, and even excellent growing conditions such as a period of very bright sunshine and warm temperatures mid-season.
Crops affected: Tomato, pepper, eggplant, and various cucurbits.

Blossom-end rot is a physiological disorder that first appears as a water-soaked, light brown spot on the distil end of the fruit. As the fruit matures, the spot becomes sunken, leathery, and brown to black. Secondary pathogens can infect the area, causing fruit rot. The disorder is more common on earliest maturing fruit. Blossom end rot is associated with a low concentration of calcium in developing fruit. In eastern Washington, this is often caused by excessive soil moisture fluctuations, drought stress, or excessive nitrogen fertilization. Soil surface mulches, appropriate irrigation timing and frequency, soil amendment with limestone, and foliar applications of calcium may reduce the incidence of this disorder.
Photo Source: Mike Bush, WSU Yakima Co. Extension Educator Photo Source: Krishna Mohan, University of Idaho

 

On-Line Resources:

Blossom-End Rot of Tomato, Pepper, and Eggplant. By Miller, S.A., R. C. Rowe, and R. M. Riedel, The Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet HYG-3117-96.

Blossom end rot: Understanding a perennial problem. Michigan State University Extension.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Blossom end rot of vegetables.


ProblemVivipary (germination of seeds while still attached to the mother plant)
Crops affected: Solanaceaous vegetables like tomato and pepper.

Photo Source: Michael Bush, Washington State University Extension, Yakima, WA

On-Line Resources:

Effect of potassium nutrition during bell pepper seed development on vivipary and endogenous levels of abscisic acid (ABA).. By Marrush, M., M. Yamaguchi and M. E. Saltveit. 1998. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 123(5):925–930.

Physiological and Nutrient Disorders. University of Kentucky Vegetable Integrated Pest Management Program. Vegetable Manuals.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Vivipary.