Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group

of Washington State University, Oregon State University, and University of Idaho

IPM Resources*

The resources listed below are for informational purposes only, and do not imply recommendation or endorsement by the PNW VEG.

Disease Forecast Systems

2010 Potato Insect Pest Survey for the Columbia Basin of Washington, Washington State University

Onion Disease Forecast Models for the northeastern U.S., New York State Integrated IPM Program, and Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA)

Potato Disease Forecast Models for the the northeastern U.S., New York State Integrated IPM Program, and Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA)

Sweet Corn Stewart’s Wilt Forecast and Pheromone Trap Catches for the northeastern U.S., New York State Integrated IPM Program, and Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA)

Tomato Disease Forecast Models for the the northeastern U.S., New York State Integrated IPM Program, and Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA)


Food Safety

Food Safety Modernization Act: Are you on the hook?. October 15, 2013, by Phil Tocco, Michigan State University Extension. There is much confusion regarding who is and is not required to comply with the proposed Food Safety Modernization Act. Learn some of the specifics about qualifications.

Fact Sheet: Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) Proposed Rule for Produce Safety: Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption. The FDA’s website provides some highlights about the rule, who the rule covers, compliance information, and where to go for more information. This proposed rule has major potential ramifications for freshly consumed foods, including many vegetables.

Time is running out to comment on the Food Safety Modernization Act. October 10, 2013, by Phil Tocco, Michigan State University Extension. The deadline for comment on the Food Safety Modernization Act’s Produce Safety Rule is fast approaching. Comments will not be accepted after November 15. Here’s how to comment effectively and best advocate for changes in the proposed rule.


Pest Identification and Management

General pest, disease, and other problems of vegetables: identification and management resources

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug. Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Oregon State University Department of Horticulture. Information on BMSB which is widespread in the Willamette Valley, and its possible damage to crops including vegetables.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug News. Information and updates for Oregon. Volume 1, Spring 2013. Oregon State University.

El Chinche Apestozo Marrón Marmolado en Vegetales (BMSB: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug) - Resumen de las recomendaciones para su control. Los autores son miembros del BMSB SCRI CAP (siglas en ingles): Equipo de Cultivo de Vegetales.

Integrated Pest Management for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Vegetables - A synopsis of what researchers have learned so far and management recommendations using an integrated approach. Authored by the BMSB SCRI CAP Vegetable Commodity Team.

WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE: Stink Bugs Still At Large in Washington State. In 1988, a statewide survey revealed 23 species of stink bug in Washington.  In 2014, this number was increased to 47 species including the invasive and dreaded Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (middle image) that was found in a handful of counties. We have reasons to believe more stink bugs exist in Washington State. If you capture any bug that resembles a stink bug, WSU Extension desperately needs the specimen mailed to us along with information that provides us with where (the town or county or GPS location captured), when (date) and on what host plant they were found on. For the details, go HERE.

Cornell University Organic Crop Production Guides. These Organic Production Guides outline general practices for growing vegetable crops using organic integrated pest management techniques. The guides provide an overall approach for organic production with a focus on biological, mechanical, and cultural controls. Sections on cover crops, resistant varieties, crop rotation, field selection, soil quality and nutrient management all highlight their interrelated qualities and precede specifics on pest management options.

Disease or disorder: How do I tell the difference? Part 1. December 22, 2014, Lina Rodriguez Salamanca, Learn how to identify disorders to ease your scouting in the greenhouse and field. A prerecorded webinar on vegetable diagnostics is now available at the Online IPM Academy.

Disease or disorder: How do I tell the difference? Part 2. December 22, 2014, Lina Rodriguez Salamanca, Recognizing diseases on vegetable transplants in the greenhouse can improve your scouting. A prerecorded webinar on vegetable diagnostics is available at the Online IPM Academy.

Got maggots in your vegetable field? Zsofia Szendrei, Michigan State University Extension. Using degree-day models can help vegetable growers figure out when to watch for insect pests such as corn and cabbage maggots.

Grafting in Vegetable Production. Vegetable grafting is relatively new to the U.S. but is quickly gaining use, especially in greenhouse tomato production. Learn about vegetable grafting from these Extension publications and presentations.

Herbicide-related injury to plant species, including vegetables (~1100 images), University of California Statewide IPM Program.

Herbicide Modes and Action and Symptoms on Plants, Richard Smith, Farm Advisor, University of California Cooperative Extension.

Hortsense. The WSU Urban IPM Program’s Hortsense website is designed for homeowner education and is used by County Extension Educators, Master Gardener Coordinators, Master Gardeners and Clinic Diagnosticians. The website contains fact sheets which provide up-to-date, research-based information on problem insects, diseases, and weeds and their management.

Insect ID Resources. Information about collecting, mounting and identifying insects.

Learn to recognize diseases on vegetable transplants in the greenhouse. Mary Hausbeck, Michigan State University. Diseases can get an early start in the greenhouse, making control difficult in the field.

Pestsense. The Pestsense website is designed for homeowner education and is used by County Extension Educators, Master Gardener Coordinators, Master Gardeners and Clinic Diagnosticians. The website contains fact sheets which provide up-to-date, research-based information on problem insects, diseases, and weeds and their management.

Plant Disease Management Strategies. APSnet. The information on this APS article is summarized in the latest issue of the MI State University Extension News for vegetables titled: Strategies for disease control in crops: Understanding the big picture can help you reduce crop losses from plant diseases, by Jim Isleib, posted October 28, 2013.

Plant Nutrient Functions and Deficiency and Toxicity Symptoms. By Ann McCauley, Montana State University Extension. This article provides information on nutrient management issues.

PNW Insect Management Handbook for Idaho, Oregon and Washington .

Presentations made at the 2015 North Willamette Horticulture Society meetings that occurred on January 13 & 14 have been posted on the Society's website for public access:
Organic Crops Section: http://nwhortsoc.com/?page_id=801
Vegetable Section: http://nwhortsoc.com/?page_id=822

Small-Scale Cost-Effective Hot Water Seed Treatment
By Frank Morton (Wild Garden Seed), Tom Stearns (High Mowing Seeds), Nick Andrews (OSU Small Farms Extension)

Hot water seed treatment is an important way of reducing the risk of seed-borne diseases, especially for organic Brassica growers (seed, fresh market or processed market) now that Pacific Northwest growers are dealing with black leg and potential light leaf spot epidemics. Hot water treatment can improve our defense against diseases like blackleg, light leaf spot, Verticillium, Fusarium, Xanthomonas, Alternaria, Botrytis and many seed-bourne viruses.

The authors have put together some slides with some practical ideas for low-cost and efficient hot water treatment.
Download the Hot Water Treatment Slideshow.

Washington State Department of Agriculture – Plants & Insects. Contact:

Brad White, Pest Program Manager
Brenda Player, Administrative Asst.
PO Box 42560
Olympia, WA 98504-2560
Phone: 360-902-2070
Fax: 360-902-2094
PestProgram@agr.wa.gov

Whatcom Ag Monthly Newsletter. WSU Whatcom County Extension newsletter focusing on Agriculture.

WSU Seed Crops IPM Website. This web site is a product of the statewide WSU Seed Crop Team funded by the WSU CAHNRS Agricultural Extension Issue-Focused Teams Initiative. This new team, led by entomologist Doug Walsh and plant pathologist Lindsey du Toit, seeks to protect and enhance the seed industries of Washington State. Other team members include weed scientists Tim Miller and Rick Boydston, plant pathologists Lyndon Porter and Ken Eastwell, county Extension educators Tim Waters and Don McMoran, and communications specialist Sally O'Neal. The Seed Crop Team brings faculty and staff from numerous disciplines and both sides of the state together to address issues impacting production of many types of seed crops.

Brassica resources

Crucifer Seed Emergency Rule

Effective July 16, 2015

For those of you who work with crucifer crops of any kind (oilseed, cover, processing, fresh market, seed, forage, etc.), here is important and time-sensitive information from Victor Shaul of the WSDA Seed Program on proposed amendments to a relavant quarantine rule in WA.

"The public hearing for the Crucifer seed quarantine was held on July 7th.  There were some substantive changes that occurred during the hearing.  The main change; in red below, was at the request of those in attendance at the hearing.  In essence, this change says that seed that was produced within the regulated areas (both the Eastern and Western Washington areas)  to be planted in the Eastern Washington regulated area does not have to be treated.  In converse, seed originating elsewhere will need to be treated.

"To recap the changes the rule proposal will:

·         Not change any requirements already in place for Crucifer seed to be planted in Western Washington.

·         Will include Eastern Washington under the Crucifer Quarantine rules.

·         Will require any Crucifer seed that will be planted in Eastern Washington to be laboratory tested and found free of Blackleg.

·         Will require any Crucifer seed from an origin outside the regulated areas* that will be planted in Eastern Washington to be treated – various options.

·         Will require any Crucifer seed that will be planted in Eastern Washington to have each container tagged with a Crucifer Quarantine tag issued by the Department.

*For reference an area outside the regulated areas would be any area outside the Western Washington counties of Clallam, Island, Lewis, Skagit and Snohomish and all counties in Eastern Washington.

"The second major occurrence was the request to implement the rule changes immediately.  The reasoning behind this request was the time it would take with the normal rule process for the rule changes to become effective.  In essence it would miss the fall planting season.  It was felt that this is such an important threat to Crucifer production that an emergency rule should be enacted as soon as possible.  To that end the Director signed the emergency rule effective on Thursday July 16th.  As of that date all Crucifer seed to be planted in Eastern Washington must be quarantine compliant.

"Lastly, due to the requested changes in the language there will be a second public hearing.  Comments can be sent by e-mail if that is more convenient.  I will send that information as well.

"I would ask everyone to assist in spreading the word about this through whatever means you can.  We are currently working on a fact sheet and mailer and hope to have that completed soon with plans to send to as wide of an audience as possible.

"Additionally, you will see attached a Crucifer Quarantine tag request form.  Please note this is specific for seed that is to be planted in Eastern Washington.  Please pass along to whomever in your company that will be handling this.

"I have also been asked what kind of seed treatments can be used for Blackleg.  Here is a resource you can use: http://cru66.cahe.wsu.edu/LabelTolerance.html and of course consult your seed treatment/chemical provider for further assistance."

Please provide feedback or recommendations to:
Victor Shaul, WSDA Seed Program Manager
vshaul@agr.wa.gov

Further Info:
- Proposed Crucifer Quarantine Rule Amendments (May, 2015)
- Proposed Rule Amendments, Amendatory Section (July, 2015)
- Crucifer Quarantine tag request form (.docx)

Video: Blackleg Disease and Resistance Management. Published by the Canola Council of Canada.

  • At the Sept. 11. 2014 Crucifer Disease Meeting in Oregon three presentations were given to update stakeholders on the current situation in the Willamette Valley for black leg, light leaf spot, and white leaf spot in crucifer crops. Powerpoint presentations by Cindy Ocamb (OSU), Nancy Osterbauer (ODA), and David Priebe (ODA), are available here in PDF versions.

Oregon Department of Agriculture permanent ruling released on black leg of brassicaceae in January 2015 – see the Brassica Production Districts document, and the OSDA Permanent Ruling document titled ‘Crucifer blackleg disease requirements moved into one regulation; removes same requirements from rapeseed production districts,’ below.

Crucifer Disease Guide - A Practical Guide for Seedsmen, Growers and Agricultural Advisors. Published by Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Inc.’s Plant Health Department and Seed Health Departments.

Management of Black Leg in Oregon on Brassica seed crops, a Clinic Close-up, Oregon State University Extension Service.

Management of Black Leg in Oregon on Vegetable Brassica Crops and Seed Crops, a Clinic Close-up, Oregon State University Extension Service.

Carrot resources

Vegetables: Growing Carrots in Home Gardens. Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet FS118E, by Marianne Ophardt.

Cucurbit resources

Biology and Management of Aphids in Organic Cucurbit Production Systems. This article by Mary Barbercheck, Penn State University, provides an overview of the biology and life cycles, damage from, and management of the most common aphid pests in organic cucurbit crops.

Cucurbit Disease Field Guide - A Disease Reference Guide for Cucumber, Melon, Squash and Watermelon. Published by Monsanto Company and Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Inc..

Vegetables: Growing Cucumbers in Home Gardens. Includes information on common problems.

Vegetables: Growing Squash in Home Gardens. Includes information on common problems.

Virus Diseases of Cucurbits, Cornell University Vegetable MD Online fact sheet.

Weed Management Strategies for Organic Cucurbit Crops in the Southern United States. Mark Schonbeck, Virginia Association for Biological Farming describes how to manage some of the most troublesome weeds of cucurbit crops in the South.

Garlic resources

California Garlic & Onion Research Advisory Board: Resources. The website has a newsletter that comes out a couple of times each year, highlighting research projects they are funding. This ‘Resources’ page also has a series of reports, Powerpoint presentations, etc. from various years of this organizations research efforts that can be downloaded.

Onion Disease Guide - A Practical Guide for Seedsmen, Growers and Agricultural Advisors. Published by Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Inc.’s Plant Health Department (covers onion and leek; mentions garlic).

Problems of Stored Garlic. Oregon State University Plant Clinic.

Legume resources

For those of you who work with bean crops of any kind (oilseed, cover, processing, fresh market, seed, forage, etc.), here is important and time-sensitive information from Victor Shaul of the WSDA Seed Program on proposed amendments to bean seed quarantine rules in WA.

Victor Shaul: "First off thank all of you that provided input and took your time coming to meetings on this important topic. 

"The public hearing for the changes to the Bean Seed Quarantine was held on July 7th.  Those in attendance were in favor of the proposed changes to the quarantine.  The effective date of these changes is August 21, 2015

 "To re-cap the changes to the quarantine are:

 ·         Bean seed fields under sprinkler irrigation will require three inspections with the option of laboratory testing for halo blight in lieu of the first inspection.

·         The elimination of the Notice of Intent quarantine reporting form.  This will be replaced with the requirement to attach proof of quarantine compliance with every phytosanitary or certified field inspection application.    

 "As previously discussed these changes come too late for this season, but I am really pleased at the number of field inspection applications that were submitted for this season that proactively implemented these methodologies.

 "These changes will necessitate new application and inspection forms, so that will be an internal winter project and you will be provided with new applications to use at that time."

Please provide feedback or recommendations to:
Victor Shaul, WSDA Seed Program Manager
vshaul@agr.wa.gov

Further Info:
Proposed Bean Seed Quarantine Rule Amendments

Adjuvant Damage on Pea. Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Aphid/Virus Tracker. A resource for managing aphid-vectored viruses in cool season legume crops in the Palouse region of the USA. University of Idaho.

Root Lesion Nematodes on Pea. Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Nematode pests

Nematodes: Integrated Pest Management for Home Gardeners and Landscape Professionals. Pest Notes, University of California publication 7489.

Major Emerging Problems with Minor Meloidogyne Species. By Axel A. Elling, Washington State University, Phytopathology Review.

Movement and Toxicity of Nematicides in the Plant Root Zone. University of Florida IFAS Extension.

Onion resources

Onion Disease Risk Assessment

Thrips & Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) Forecast
Bacterial Disease Forecasts
Fungal Disease Forecasts

Allium Net: SCRI Project Updates Talks and Publications

California Garlic & Onion Research Advisory Board: Resources. The website has a newsletter that comes out a couple of times each year, highlighting research projects they are funding. This ‘Resources’ page also has a series of reports, Powerpoint presentations, etc. from various years of this organizations research efforts that can be downloaded.

Internal Dry Scale and Associated Bulb Rots of Onion. A common problem was observed in the 2014–2015 season and the 2015–2016 onion-growing season on red, white, and yellow cultivars—internal dry scale. Careful monitoring of crop moisture demand to increase our understanding of onion physiology, particularly close to harvest, will help in the development of effective management practices to reduce the impact of internal dry scale on this important region of onion production.

News From the Field. August 14, 2012 issue of Onion ipmPIPE newsletter. Featuring the latest field observations from onion researchers around the country, this newsletter is designed to educate and inform growers, consultants, buyers, shippers and other onion industry stakeholders about the Onion ipmPIPE initative.

Onion Disease Guide - A Practical Guide for Seedsmen, Growers and Agricultural Advisors. Published by Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Inc.’s Plant Health Department.

Onion ipmPIPE. Extensive resources on various aspects of onion production. Announcement of the site’s launch and Onion ipmPIPE brochure.

Onion Thrips, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet, FS126E.

Pest Management Strategic Plan for Dry Bulb Storage Onions in the United States

Yellow Nutsedge. Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Pea Resources

Pea Disease Diagnostic Series, North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station

Potato resources

Helping Growers Manage Potato Psyllids & Zebra Chip in the Columbia Basin of Washington State, a webcast for potato growers & specialists prepared by Carrie Wohleb for the APS Plant Management Network. The webcast is open access for a limited duration, after which you need to be a member of APS or have a subscription to APS PMN to view the webcast.

Early Blight: A Global Management Issue on Potatoes. Managing early blight requires the careful integration of cultural and chemical methods, including rotation, choice of cultivar, plant nutrition and fungicide application. This webcast by Dr. Walter Stevenson, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, helps consultants, growers and practitioners diagnose and manage early blight of potato in the field and in storage. This on-demand presentation will help users diagnose this disease, understand other important details about the pathogen, such as the disease cycle, and reduce reliance on weekly application of fungicides.

Focus on Potato. Educational webcasts and other potato crop resources. Plant Management Network International.

Focus on Potato webcast: “Best Management Tactics and Fungicide Resistance in Early Blight and Brown Spot” by Dr. Lydia Tymon, plant pathologist at Washington State University.

‘Focus on Potato’ Webcast Helps Users Minimize Spread of Blackleg

Blackleg, caused by strains of soft rot bacteria known as Dickeya, has traditionally had little impact on North American potato production, but it now appears to be on the move throughout Europe and could threaten growers in the United States.

The Plant Management Network (PMN) has released a presentation entitled “Dickeya: A Scottish, UK and European Perspective” to provide growers and consultants an overview of the history of the disease in Europe, and an introduction to Dickeya solani, a new aggressive pathogen strain contributing to an increase in the incidence and spread of blackleg. The webcast was developed by Gerry Saddler, Deputy Head of Science & Advice Scottish Agriculture with the Scottish Government, and details that country’s potato production practices and explains why they have adopted a national zero-tolerance approach to the presence of Dickeya strains. The presentation discusses:

ˇ Causes of blackleg and symptoms exhibited by different strains

ˇ Conditions that encourage infection and common transmission methods

ˇ Inspection and testing practices employed in Scotland

ˇ Effective control measures to limit spread

The 40-minute presentation will remain open access through July 31 in the Focus on Potato webcast resource. The Plant Management Network is a nonprofit publisher of applied, science-based resources that help enhance the health, management, and production of agricultural and horticultural crops. Partnering with over 80 universities, nonprofits, and agribusinesses, PMN provides materials covering a wide range of crops and contemporary issues through the online PMN Education Center.

Guidelines for applying Stadium to potato tubers, by Willie Kirk, Michigan State University Vegetable Newsletter dated September 24, 2013. A new product, Stadium, is now registered as a pre-storage treatment for managing Fusarium dry rot and silver scurf in potato storage.

Herbicide Carryover in Potato Seed. Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Identification & Management of Major Pest and Beneficial Insects in Potato. Oregon State University

Internal Heat Necrosis of Potato. Plant Management Network International.

Integrated Pest Management in Potato Production. In summer of 2009 a USDA grant of over $2 million was awarded to a team of scientists and extension educators to develop new information and technologies for improving Integrated Pest Management (IPM) options in potato production. This IPM portion of the potatoes.com site will be a one-stop-shopping clearinghouse for potato pest management information.

Pink Rot of Potato. In this talk, Dr. Jeff Miller of Miller Research helps users in North American potato production systems understand the pink rot disease cycle on potato. He illustrates the various symptoms of pink rot, as well as focuses on the in-season and post-harvest management of this economically important disease.

Portable test kits for diagnosing potato diseases. University of Idaho Extension. This bulletin summarizes an evaluation of test kits, discusses making an initial disease diagnosis, using pathogen test kits, and their accuracy.

Potato Insect Pest Survey for the Columbia Basin of Washington. A resource for managing aphids, tuberworms, leafhoppers, and other insects in potatoes in the Columbia Basin region of the USA. Washington State University.

Potato Progress, Volume 17 Number 9, dated June 16, 2017. Research & Extension for the Potato Industry of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. In this issue: some useful information on fungicides and late blight.
--Andy Jensen, Ph.D., Manager, Northwest Potato Research Consortium 

Back issues of Potato Progress are available at Northwest Potato Research.

Powdery Scab of Potato. In the online presentation Practical Management of Powdery Scab Dr. Robert Davidson, plant pathologist at Colorado State University, helps viewers identify and manage this devastating and hard-to-control disease using an integrated approach. Key symptoms used to identify the various stages of the disease are described and contrasted with other similar problems. Management options discussed include avoiding the disease, measuring the inoculum load in soil, making the appropriate cultivar selections based upon the field history, resistance of a given cultivar, inoculum levels and environment; and utilizing specific chemical controls.

Preventing the Spread of Potato Viruses: What Insecticides Can and Cannot Do (Video)- Andrei Alyokhin, University of Maine. Of particular interest given the prevalence of problems with PVY, etc. in the PNW, and controversy over insecticide use for management of some potato viruses.

Soft Rot and Blackleg Diseases of Potato. This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners control bacterial blackleg, soft rot, and stem rot in potato by providing information on how to interfere with these diseases at planting, during the growing season and at harvest.

Storage Management of Blazer Russet Potatoes. This bulletin describes best storage management practices for ‘Blazer Russet’ released in 2005 by the USDA ARS and the agricultural experiment stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. This is an early-maturing and high-yielding variety acceptable for fresh market or early season processing. This variety has acceptable fry color when stored at 48° F and has a shorter dormancy length than Russet Burbank.

Superficial growth on potatoes. University of Idaho. This bulletin outlines factors that may promote superficial growth of non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria that can grow on the surface of a potato. Management practices to reduce the potential for superficial growth are also discussed.

Toxic Seed Piece Syndrome (TSPS). Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Using Pathogen Detection Test Kits for Rapid Potato Disease Diagnosis. Test kits can be helpful in eliminating disease misdiagnoses and identifying whether the issue is physiological or chemical and not due to a pathogen. An online video by Nora Olsen at the University of Idaho.

White Mold of Potato: Epidemiology and Management. In this slideshow presentation Dr. Dennis Johnson provides an overview of white mold or Scherotinia stem rot of potato. It will help viewers understand how white mold can be better managed by modifying the canopy environment and by timing control tactics based on the disease cycle. The presentation offers images of the disease, explains the cause, and defines environmental and plant developmental factors that lead to the disease.

Zebra Chip

Washington Potato Growers, allied industry,

Zebra Chip, a disease seriously impacting potatoes produced in Texas and other Southwest states in recent years, has been found impacting potatoes in the southern Columbia Basin this year. Phil Hamm with Oregon State University has sent out a message to industry, which is pasted below my contact information. In addition to his message, I’ve included two informational items and provided two links to much more reading material. Please contact me, Phil, Jim Crosslin, or Joe Munyaneza with questions.

Information on the psyllid.

Information on the disease and recent research:
History in the Making: Potato Zebra Chip Disease Associated with a New Psyllid-borne Bacterium – A Tale of Striped Potatoes
The Zebra Chip Project, Texas Agrilife Research and Extensioin Center at Amarillo.

Photo of potato affected by Zebra Chip

A photo of tuber symptoms post peeling.

Andy Jensen, Ph.D.
Director of Research
Washington State Potato Commission
108 S. Interlake Rd.
Moses Lake, WA 98837

Phone: 509-765-8845
Cell: 509-760-4859
Web: http://www.potatoes.com

Phil Hamm’s message to industry

Sweet Corn Resources

Plant Management Network "Focus on Corn" Webinars:

Adult Corn Rootworm Suppression - Lance J. Meinke, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Decision Tree for Grower Management Options: Re-Learning Corn Rootworm Management in the Transgenic Era - Ken Ostlie, University of Minnesota

Larval Corn Rootworm Management - Robert Wright, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Resistance Evolution and IRM for Rootworm - Aaron Gassmann, Iowa State University

Rootworm Biology and Behavior - Joseph L. Spencer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Western corn rootworm in eastern Oregon, Idaho, and eastern Washington. In the Pacific Northwest, western corn rootworm has been found in corn crops in eastern Oregon, Idaho, and eastern Washington. Though it is not as abundant in the PNW as it is in the Midwest, WCR still has the potential to damage corn in the region.


Tomato resources

Bacterial canker ravages processing tomatoes. Learn how to recognize bacterial canker now to manage this disease in the future.

MSU’s Research results for bacterial canker in tomatoes. Research indicates it is best to manage canker before field planting tomatoes.

Bacterial spot damages Michigan peppers. Spring and summer rains favor disease; coppers can help but not cure bacterial spot on peppers.

Curly Top Disease of Tomato. In his Focus on Tomato webcast, Bill Wintermantel, Research Plant Pathologist at USDA-ARS in Salinas, California, discusses the viruses that cause curly top disease, as well as Curly Top’s biology, transmission through vectors, epidemiology, and management.

Focus on Tomato. Educational webcasts, a search tool for finding information on tomato at university extension websites or articles, and other resources. Plant Management Network International.

Integrated Pest Management of Whiteflies and TYLCV in Florida Fresh Market Tomato. In this Focus on Tomato presentation, University of Florida entomology professor Phil Stansly helps consultants, growers, and other practitioners develop a balanced approach to management of this pest and this associated virus. This integrated approach includes various biological, cultural, insecticidal, and host plant resistance strategies. By the end of this presentation, viewers in tomato growing regions of the U.S. will understand the strengths and weakness of each approach and also have a roadmap for integrating them into a workable and sustainable system.

New ‘Tomato MD’ App Helps Users Diagnose and Treat Sick Tomato Plants: Tomatoes are one of the most common crops in the U.S. But while popular, they are not always easy to treat when affected by plant diseases or bugs. With such a wide range of pests that affect tomato plants, growers can have a difficult time identifying and treating them. Enter Tomato MD, part of the new “Plant Health” family of apps for the iPhone or iPad. Tomato MD is an interactive reference that helps gardeners, professional growers, and consultants identify and manage more than 35 key diseases, insects, and physiological disorders of tomatoes. Tomato MD is unique in that tomato experts have peer-reviewed all content to ensure the images and information are accurate. And while the information was reviewed by scientists, it is very accessible and published in an easy-to-use, non-scientific format.

Nutrient Management in Fresh Market Tomatoes. This presentation by Dr. Josh Freeman, Assistant Professor of Horticulture at Virginia Tech University, helps users ensure their tomato crops have the correct amount of nutrients in the correct placement at the correct time. Dr. Freeman also instructs viewers on providing adequate moisture for nutrient uptake and utilization.

Processing Tomato Production: Seed Sector and Propagation in California (recorded webcast). Tomato production in California has evolved substantially since the 1980s. The shift from field seeding to the use of greenhouse-grown transplants is central to this transformation and has increased production costs, overall yield, and the number of varieties grown today.

Providing an overview of this evolution is a new educational presentation from the Plant Management Network (PMN) entitled “Processing Tomato Production: Seed Sector and Propagation in California." The webcast was developed by Gene Miyao, a Vegetable Crops Farm Advisor with the University of California Cooperative Extension for Yolo–Solano–Sacramento Counties, and is now available as part of the Focus on Tomato resource for growers, crop consultants, and extension agents.

The presentation describes why tomato growers have widely adopted transplanting methods and illustrates how the changes have significantly impacted fertilization, planting, and irrigation practices as well as raised production and labor costs. Viewers will gain a better understanding how current standard practices in California may influence future trends involving:

ˇ         Fertilization practices

ˇ         Planting automation

ˇ         Characteristics selection

ˇ         Tolerance and pest resistance

ˇ         Harvest disturbance

The 14-minute presentation is freely available in the Focus on Tomato webcast resource through May 2016.

The Plant Management Network is a nonprofit publisher of applied, science-based resources that help enhance the health, management, and production of agricultural and horticultural crops. Partnering with over 80 universities, nonprofits, and agribusinesses, PMN provides materials covering a wide range of crops and contemporary issues through the online PMN Education Center.

To learn about PMN’s latest articles, webcasts, and other information, sign up for the electronic newsletter, PMN Update.

Protect tomato transplants in the greenhouse from bacterial diseases. Mary Hausbeck, Michigan State University Extension. Although some details are specific to Michigan, the general principles in this post apply to all tomato transplant production operations.

Protect tomato transplants in the greenhouse from fungal diseases. Mary Hausbeck, Michigan State University Extension. Although some details are specific to Michigan, the general principles in this post apply to all tomato transplant production operations.

Septoria Leaf Spot of Tomato. In this talk Dr. Zitter, Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist at Cornell University, helps consultants, growers, homeowners, practitioners and allied industries in all regions better understand Septoria leaf spot (SLS) and how to manage it. Plant Management Network International.

Thrips as Pests and Vectors of Tospoviruses in Tomato. This online presentation by George Kennedy at North Carolina State University will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the southern and western USA understand the role of thrips as direct pests and as vectors of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tomato.

Tomato Disease Guide - A Practical Guide for Seedsmen, Growers and Agricultural Advisors. Published by Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Inc.’s Plant Health Department.

Tomato Diseases Favored by High Tunnel Greenhouses (recorded webscast, Dec. 2013)
By Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist, Cornell University.

Tomato late blight not favored by hot and dry weather. Mary Hausbeck, Michigan State University Extension. Review symptoms and recommendations to know how to manage late blight.


Weed Identification

Washington State weed or plant identification requests can be made through the Washington State University Crop and Soil Sciences Weed Identification website. Weed specimens may be submitted as digital images or as physical specimens, at no charge, by following instructions on this site.
 

Pesticide Information Centers / Services

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center

Oregon State University’s Identification & Management of Major Pest and Beneficial Insects in Potato

Washington State University’s Pesticide Information Center On-Line (PICOL)

Washington State University’s Pesticide Notification Network (PNN)

Washington State University’s Washington State Pest Management Resource Service (WSPRS)


Weed Control

Herbicides for in-season weed management in red beets. Available herbicides target a variety of weeds in red beet production.

Pacific Northwest Weed Management Handbook.Sections of the handbook include Vegetable Crops, Vegetable Seed Crops, and Greenhouse Floors among others.


* For additions/changes to these vegetable resource listings, contact Lindsey du Toit or Debbie Inglis

Our pages provide links to external sites for the convenience of users. WSU Extension does not manage these external sites, nor does Extension review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these sites. These external sites do not implicitly or explicitly represent official positions and policies of WSU Extension.

WSU Mount Vernon NWREC, 16650 State Route 536, Mount Vernon, WA 98273-4768, 360-848-6120
Contact Us: Lindsey du Toit and Carol Miles