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Photo Gallery of Vegetable Problems – Potato


General Potato Disease and Pest Management

Diseases

Aster yellows

Bacterial soft rot

Black dot

Black leg

Black scurf

Corky ring spot

Curly top

Early blight

Early dying

Erwinia

Fusarium Dry Rot

Late Blight

Leaf roll

Mop Top

Pink eye

Pink rot

Powdery scab

Purple Top

PVY

Pythium

Pythium leak

Rhizoctonia stem lesion

Ring rot

Ring rot and soft rot

Silver scurf

Skin stain symptoms

Tomato spotted wilt

Verticillium wilt

White mold

Zebra chip

Nematodes

Root knot

Insect/Mite Pests

Aphids

Beet leafhopper

Blister beetle

Colorado potato beetle

Flea beetle

Potato psyllid

Spider mites

Tomato hornworm

Tuberworm

Western flower thrips

Wireworm

Abiotic Problems Common to Potato

Herbicide carryover in potato seed Physiological leaf roll Toxic seed piece syndrome

(Click on photo to enlarge)

General Potato Disease and Pest Management

Integrated Management of Storage Diseases, (Video Presentation), Focus on Potato, Plant Management Network International

Diseases

Disease: Aster yellows
Pathogen: Aster yellows phytoplasma
Vector: Aster leafhopper (Macrosteles fascifrons) and other leafhoppers, and the phytoplasma can be carried in infected tubers
Host crops: Over 300 kinds of plants, including a wide variety of vegetables. Broccoli, cabbage, carrot, onion, potato, pumpkin, radish, shallot, spinach, squash, tomato, and more.

Potato plant with a seed-borne infection of the aster yellows phytoplasma.
Potato plant with a seed-borne infection of the aster yellows phytoplasma.
Photo Source: Carrie Wohleb, WSU Extension Educator, Grant/Adams Counties

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Aster Yellows {Late-breaking Virus}

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Aster – Yellows


Disease: Bacterial soft rot
Pathogen: Pectobacterium

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: D. Johnson Photo Source: B. Gundersen
Photo Source: B. Gundersen Photo Source: D. Johnson

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Bacterial Soft Rot and Blackleg and Lenticel Rot

Bacterial Soft Rot and Lenticel Spot on Potato Tubers, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet.

Potato: Bacterial soft rot and blackleg, Washington State University Hortsense

Potato Progress, Volume 15, Number 12, dated September 8, 2015. Research & Extension for the Potato Industry of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. This issue covers the many details of bacterial soft rot diseases of potato and how they should be managed late season and in storage.


Disease: Black dot
Pathogen: Colletotrichum coccodes

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Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Black Dot


Disease: Black leg
Pathogen: Erwinia species

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Bacterial Soft Rot and Blackleg and Lenticel Rot

Soft Rot and Blackleg Diseases of Potato, Plant Management Network International

Potato: Bacterial soft rot and blackleg, Washington State University Hortsense

Potato Progress, Volume 15, Number 12, dated September 8, 2015. Research & Extension for the Potato Industry of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. This issue covers the many details of bacterial soft rot diseases of potato and how they should be managed late season and in storage.


Disease: Black scurf
Pathogen: Rhizoctonia solani

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Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Rhizoctonia Canker {Black Scurf}

Potato: Rhizoctonia canker (Black scurf), Washington State University


Disease: Corky ring spot
Pathogen: Tobacco rattle virus, transmitted by soilborne nematodes, Trichodorus spp. andParatrichodorus spp.

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: Phil Hamm, OSU Hermiston IAREC
Internal tuber symptoms of corky ringspot.
Photo Source: Jordan Eggers, Oregon State University

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Corky Ringspot


Disease: Curly top
Pathogen: Beet curly top virus (BCTV), vectored by the beet leafhopper Circulifer tenellus
Host crops: Numerous plant species including many vegetables such as bean, beet, carrot,eggplantcoriander, pepper, potato, tomato, and various cucurbits such as squash,cucumberpumpkinwatermelon, etc.

Symptoms of curly top on tomato leaves.
Photo Source: E. J. Sorensen Photo Source: Phil Hamm, Oregon State University
Symptoms of curly top on tomato leaves.
Photo Source: Krishna Mohan, University of Idaho

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Green Dwarf {Curly Top}


Disease: Early blight
Pathogen: Alternaria solani

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: The American Phytopathological Society

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Early Blight

 

Early Blight: A Global Management Issue on Potatoes (Video Presentation), Focus on Potato, Plant Management Network International.

Focus on Potato webcast: “Best Management Tactics and Fungicide Resistance in Early Blight and Brown Spot” by Dr. Lydia Tymon, plant pathologist at Washington State University.


Disease: Early dying
Pathogen: Meloidogyne and Verticillium

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Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Verticillium Wilt {Potato Early Dying}

Potato: Verticillium Wilt (Potato early dying), Washington State University Hortsense


Disease: Erwinia
Pathogen: Erwinia

Potato ‘Ranger Russet’ (early stem symptoms)
Potato ‘Ranger Russet’ (early stem symptoms)
Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:


Disease: Fusarium Dry Rot
Pathogen: Fusarium spp.

Photo Source: D. A. Inglis and B. Gundersen

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Fusarium Dry Rot

Fusarium Dry Rot of Potatoes, Plant Management Network International


Disease: Late Blight
Pathogen: Phytophthora infestans

Photo Source: D.A. Inglis and J. Gigot

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Late Blight

Organic Management of Late Blight of Potato and Tomato (Phytophthora infestans), eXtension.

Potato Late Blight, Plant Management Network International. (video)

A potato late blight forecasting model for the Columbia Basin can be accessed via the WSU AgWeatherNet website at http://weather.wsu.edu/. Subscription to AgWeatherNet is free of charge.

ARS Scientists Seek Blight-Resistant Spuds, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

Potato Diseases: Late Blight, Extension Bulletin E-2945, Michigan State University.

 


Disease: Leaf roll (net necrosis symptoms on potato tubers)
Pathogen: Potato leaf roll virus

Net necrosis caused by PLRV in steam-peeled tubers of the cultivar Russet Burbank.
Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: Jordan Eggers, Oregon State University

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Potato Leafroll Virus {Leaf Roll}

Potato: Potato leafroll mosaic (Leafroll), Washington State University Hortsense


Disease: Mop Top
Pathogen: Potato mop-top virus (PMTV), a pomovirus vectored by the soilborne organism,Spongospora subterrenea. The latter also causes powdery scab (see Powdery scab below)

Symptoms of Potato mop top virus infection of tubers of various potato cultivars.
Photo Source: Jordan Eggers

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Potato Mop-Top Virus


Common Name: Pink eye of potato
Latin binomial: Unknown causal agent, occasionally observed in white- and russet-skinned cultivars, but not red-skinned cultivars. The disease has been associated with some bacteria, and is reported to be more severe in cultivars susceptible to Verticillium wilt.

Symptoms of pink eye of potato tubers.
Photo Source: Karen Ward, Washington State University Plant Diagnostician. Photo Source: Jordan Egger, Oregon State University
Symptoms of pink eye of potato tubers.
Photo Source: Jordan Egger, Oregon State University

Online Resources:

Potato – Pink Eye or Brown Eye, Vegetable MD Online, Cornell University

Pink Eye of Potato, Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture and Forestry, Canada

Relationship of Verticillium Wilt with Pink-Eye of Potato in Maine, USDA National Agricultural Library’s Digital Collections


Disease: Pink rot
Pathogen: Phytophthora erythroseptica

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: Jordan Eggers, Oregon State University

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Pink Rot


Disease: Powdery scab
Pathogen: Spongospora subterranea

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: Babette Gundersen

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Powdery Scab

Potato: Powdery scab, Washington State University Hortsense


Disease: Purple Top
Pathogen: Beet leafhopper transmitted virescence agent (BLTVA), a phytoplasma
Vector: Beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), and the phytoplasma can be carried in infected tubers.

Symptoms on a stem and leaves of a potato plant infected with BLTVA as a result of current-season infection.
Symptoms on a stem and leaves of a potato plant infected with BLTVA as a result of current-season infection.
Photo Source: Pete Thomas, USDA-ARS Prosser

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Purple Top


Disease: PVY
Pathogen: Potato virus Y (PVY), a virus transmitted mechanically and by insects (aphids)

Foliar mosaic symptoms caused by PVY on potato cultivars Ranger, Burbank, and Alturas (in order left to right).
Photo Source: Jordan Eggers, Oregon State University
 Symptoms of PVY infection on the potato cultivar Canela Russet.
Photo Source: Jordan Eggers, Oregon State University Photo Source: Carrie Wohleb, WSU Extension Educator for Grant/Adams Counties
Severe symptoms of Potato virus Y infection on the potato cultivar Chieftain.
Photo Source: Babette Gunderson, Washington State University

Online Resources:

Seedborne Potato Virus Y (PVY), Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Latent Viruses


Disease: Pythium
Pathogen: Pythium species

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Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:


Disease: Pythium leak
Pathogen: Pythium species

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Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Leak


Disease: Rhizoctonia stem lesion
Pathogen: Rhizoctonia solani

Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Rhizoctonia Canker {Black Scurf}


Disease: Ring rot
Pathogen: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus

 

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: Jordan Eggers, Oregon State University Photo Source: Babette Gundersen

 

Online Resources:

Bacterial Ring Rot on Potatoes, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet FS102E

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Ring Rot

Potato: Bacterial Ring Rot, UC IPM Online, University of California

Bacterial Ring Rot of Potatoes, Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet

Recognizing and Managing Bacterial Ring Rot, University of Idaho

AgDia Testing Services


Disease: Ring rot and soft rot
Pathogen: Bacterial species

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Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Bacterial Soft Rot and Lenticel Spot on Potato Tubers, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet.

Potato: Bacterial Soft Rot and Blackleg, UC IPM Online

Soft Rot and Blackleg Diseases of Potato, Plant Management Network International


Disease: Silver scurf
Pathogen: Helminthosporium solani

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Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:

Silver Scurf Management in Potatoes, Oregon State University, University of Idaho, Washington State University

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Silver Scurf


Disease: Skin stain symptoms
Pathogen: Fusarium species

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Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:


Disease: Tomato spotted wilt
Pathogen: Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)

Foliar symptoms of tomato spotted wilt on a potato plant.
Photo Source: Jordan Eggers and Phil Hamm

Online Resources: This disease is more commonly associated with tomato and other crops than with potato.

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) – Tomato Spotted Wilt, See Also:Greenhouse Plants, Ornamental Impatiens Necrotic Spot

Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus, Vegetable MD Online, Cornell University

First Report of Tomato spotted wilt virus Causing Potato Tuber Necrosis in Texas. APS Journals, The American Phytopathological Socitey


Disease: Verticillium wilt
Pathogen: Verticillium dahliae
Host crops: Numerous vegetables including many brassica vegetables (but not broccoli), cucumber, eggplant, pepper, potato, pumpkin, radish, spinachtomatowatermelon, etc.

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Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Verticillium Wilt {Potato Early Dying}

Potato: Verticillium wilt (Potato early dying), Washington State University Hortsense

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Verticillium wilt.


Disease: White mold
Pathogen: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
Host cropsBean, various brassica vegetables, carrot, eggplant, lettuce, potato, tomato, etc.

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Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – White Mold {Sclerotinia Stem Rot}

White Mold of Potato: Epidemiology and Management, Plant Management Network International.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: White mold.


Disease: Zebra chip
Pathogen: Candidatus Liberibacter Solanacearum
Vector: Potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli

Photo Source: Silvia Rondon, Oregon State University
Photo Source: Silvia Rondon, Oregon State University Photo Source: OSU-HAREC Rondon’s lab (A. Murphy)
Photo Source: Carrie H. Wohleb, WSU

 

Online Resources: Information on the Potato psyllid.

Potato Psyllid Vector of Zebra Chip Disease in the Pacific Northwest: Biology, Ecology, and Management, PNW 633.

History in the Making: Potato Zebra Chip Disease Associated with a New Psyllid-borne Bacterium – A Tale of Striped Potatoes

The Zebra Chip Project, Texas Agrilife Research and Extension Center at Amarillo.

Phil Hamm’s message to the industry.

Nematodes

Disease: Root knot
Pathogen: Meloidogyne species
Host crops: Numerous plant species, including many vegetables such as carrotcoriander, onion, potato, etc.

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Potato (Solanum tuberosum) – Nematode, Root-knot

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Root knot

Insect/Mite Pests

Common Name: Green peach aphid and potato aphid

Latin binomial: Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae, respectively
Host crops: In addition to potato, tomato, eggplant and pepper, the green peach aphid can feed on many other vegetables including broccoli, cabbage, spinach, Swiss chard, squash, pumpkin, beet as well as many weed species including Brassicaceae (cruciferous) weeds. The potato aphid can feed on cucumber, potato, melon, tomato, pumpkins, squash, and corn seed.

Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook: Vegetable crop pests-Aphid

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook: Potato, Irish – Aphid

Common Insect & Mite: Aphids, Washington State University Hortsense.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Aphids

For aphids on other crops see: pumpkin, and squash


Common Name: Beet leafhopper
Latin binomial: Circulifer tenellus
Host crops: Wide host range, including many vegetables. The Beet leafhopper is able to transmit a phytoplasma, the beet leafhopper transmitted virescence agent (BLTVA), to plants such as potato, carrot, and radish. It can also transmit the curly top virus to plants such as bean, tomato, pepper, pumpkin, and squash.

The adult beet leafhopper is a small, wedge-shaped insect, approximately 1/8 inch long.
The adult beet leafhopper is a small, wedge-shaped insect, approximately 1/8 inch long.
Photo Source: Andy Jensen, Washington Potato Commission

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook: Potato, Irish – Leafhopper

Potato: Beet Leafhopper, UC IPM Online, University of California


Common Name: Blister beetle
Latin binomial: Epicauta spp. including E. maculata
Host crops: Blister beetles are typically considered beneficial insects as the larvae feed on grasshopper eggs, but they are occasional pests on crops such as alfalfa, beets, beans, clover, potatoes, other vegetable and field crops, and native plants.

Blister beetles defoliated a short section of an outside row of a potato crop, but did a little damage beyond that. The potato crop was adjacent to rangeland that had a lot of grasshopper eggs on which blister beetle larvae feed.
Photo Source: Sally Hubbs
Adult blister beetle of the species Epicauta pruinosa, which is differentiated from adults of E. fabricii by the second antennal segment: shorter than the third segment on E. pruinosa but longer or equal to the third segment on E. fabricii. E. fabriciihas a range south and east of Oregon, while E. pruinosaappears to be common in the Pacific Northwest and has a wider range. The two species produce different levels of cantharin, which is toxic and lethal to cattle.
Photo Source: OSU-HAREC Rondon’s lab (A. Murphy)

Online Resources:

Blister Beetles: Coleptera: Meloidae Epicauta maculata, E. fabricii, E. puncticollis, Lytta nutalli. Modified from G. Bishop, et al. 1982. Management of Potato Insects in the Western States, Integrated Plant Protection Center of Oregon State University.

Blister Beetles, Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Blister beetle.

 


Common Name: Colorado potato beetle
Latin binomial: Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).
Host crops: potato and tomato. Will feed on eggplant, tobacco and weeds in the Solanumgenus.

The adult Colorado potato beetle measure about 3/8 inch(8–10 mm), yellowish-orange in color and sometimes called the 10-lined potato beetle. The mature larva of the Colorado potato beetle measures 1/2 inch long, has a reddish brown body color with two rows of black spots running along the sides, and a black head capsule.
Photo Source: Lerry Lacey, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA Photo Source: Lerry Lacey, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA
Colorado potato beetle lays yellow to orange, football-shaped eggs (1/16 inch tall) on the underside of potato leaves. A lacewing larva is grazing on this batch of Colorado potato beetle eggs.
Colorado potato beetle lays yellow to orange, football-shaped eggs (1/16 inch tall) on the underside of potato leaves. A lacewing larva is grazing on this batch of Colorado potato beetle eggs.
Photo Source:Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

Online Resources:

Colorado Potato Beetle. Extension Bulletin 0919, Washington State University.

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Chapter: Irish Potatoes, Section: Colorado potato beetle to Cutworm and Armyworm.


Common Name: Flea beetle
Latin binomial: Pictured is the western potato flea beetle, Epitrix subcrinita, but the tuber flea beetle, Epitrix tuberis, may also damage foliage.
Host crops: Eggplant, pepper, potato, and tomato.

Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

Online Resources:

Potato Flea Beetles: Biology and Control. Washington State University Extension Bulletin 1198E.

Potato Flea Beetles. Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Western Potato Flea Beetle Epitrix subcrinita, Tuber Flea Beetle Epitrix tuberis

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Chapter: Irish Potatoes, Section: Flea Beetle to Grasshopper.

Vegetables: Potato: Potato flea beetles. Washington State University Hortsense.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Flea beetle.


Common Name: Potato psyllid
Latin binomial: Bactericera cockerelli

Photo Source: OSU-HAREC Rondon’s lab (A. Murphy)

Online Resources: Information on the Potato psyllid.

History in the Making: Potato Zebra Chip Disease Associated with a New Psyllid-borne Bacterium – A Tale of Striped Potatoes
The Zebra Chip Project, Texas Agrilife Research and Extensioin Center at Amarillo.

Phil Hamm’s message to the industry.


Common Name: Spider mites
Latin binomial: Tetranychus spp. including twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), strawberry spider mite (Tetranychus turkestani), and Pacific spider mite (Tetranychus pacificus)
Host crops: Wide host range, including many vegetables such as bean, carrot seed crops, potato, etc.

Photo Source:Silvia Rondon, Oregon State University

Online Resources:

Some Common Plant-Feeding Mites and Plant-Inhabiting Mite Predators in the Northwestern United States. PNW Insect Management Handbook.

Lima Bean – Spider Mites. PNW Insect Management Handbook.

Carrot seed – Twospotted spider mite. PNW Insect Management Handbook, Chapter: Vegetable Seed, Section: Carrot Seed.

Managing spider mites in gardens and landscapes. University of California Online Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.

See See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Spider mites.


Common name (of damaging stage): Tomato hornworm
Latin binomial: Manduca quinquemaculata
Host cropsPeppereggplant, potato, and tomato.

Photo Source: Michael Bush, WSU Extension, Yakima, WA

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Washington State Chapter: Vegetables, Section: Tomato Part2: Fleabeetle to Wireworm.

Vegetables: Tomato: Tomato hornworm. Washington State University Hortsense.

UC Pest Management Guidelines: Tomato Hornworms. UC IPM Online, University of California.


Common Name: Tuberworm
Latin binomial: Phthorimaea operculella.

Potato tuberworm larval damage to potato tubers.
Photo Source: Silvia Rondon
Tuberworm larva.
Tuberworm larva.
Photo Source: Lynn Ketchum

Online Resources:

Biology and Management of the Potato Tuberworm in the Pacific Northwest. PNW 594

New Emerging Pests in the Pacific Northwest. The Potato Association of America.

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Chapter: Irish Potatoes, Section: Tuberworm to Wireworm.


Common Name: Western flower thrips
Latin binomial: Frankliniella occidentalis.
Host cropsBasilBroccoliCabbageCauliflowerCucumberOnion, Potato, PumpkinSquash,Tomato and Watermelon.

Photo Source: Silvia Rondon

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Chapter: Irish Potatoes, Section: Lygus bug to Thrips.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Western flower thrips.


Common name (of damaging stage): Wireworm
Latin binomial: Pictured are Limonius spp. (including L. canus and L. californicus). Other wireworm species including Agriotes spp. and Ctenicera spp. can be pestiferous.
Host crops: Potato, onioncarrot, beet, spinach seed crops and radish. Other crops, like corn,beans and peas can be impacted by high densities of wireworms feeding on seedlings resulting in poor crop stands.

Photo Source: David Horton, USDA-ARS, Wapato Photo Source: Andy Jensen, WA Potato Commission
Photo Source: Oregon State University – Oregon State Arthropod Collection.

Online Resources:

WIREWORMS Coleoptera: Elateridae, Pacific Coast Wireworm Limonius canus, Sugarbeet Wireworm L. californicus, Great Basin Wireworm Ctenicera pruinina. Integrated Plant Protection Center of Oregon State University.

Wireworm Biology and Nonchemical Management in Potatoes in the Pacific Northwest. Extension Bulletin PNW 607.

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook. Chapter: Irish Potatoes, Section: Tuberworm to Wireworm.

Wireworm Field Guide – A guide to the identification and control of wireworms, Syngenta Crop Protection Canada, Inc.

Wireworm Biology and Nonchemical Management in Potatoes in the Pacific Northwest, N. Andrews, M. Ambrosino, G. Fisher, and S.I. Rondon, Pacific Northwest Extension Publication no. PNW607

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Wireworm.

 

Abiotic Problems Common to Potato

Problem: Herbicide carryover in potato seed
Crops affected: Most, if not all, crops can be affected by herbicides used to control weeds.

Photo Source: Carrie Wohleb, WSU

Online Resources:

Herbicide Carryover in Potato Seed. Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest, Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

 

Problem: Physiological leaf roll
Cause: Various environmental conditions and management practices
Crops affected: