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Photo Gallery of Vegetable Problems – Pea


Diseases

Aphanomyces root rot

Downy mildew

Fusarium root rot

Fusarium wilt

Pea seedborne mosaic

Powdery mildew

Root rot complex

Thielaviopsis root rot

Nematodes

Pea cyst nematode Root lesion nematode

Insect/Mite Pests

Pea moth Pea weevil Seedcorn maggot

Abiotic Problems

Adjuvant Damage Edema

(Click on photo to enlarge)

Diseases

Disease: Aphanomyces root rot
Pathogen: Aphanomyces euteiches
Host Crop: Pea

Photo Source: Lyndon Porter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Aphanomyces Root Rot

See also: Root rot complex caused by mixed infections of Fusarium wilt (FW), Aphanomyces root rot (ARR) and Fusarium root rot (FRR).


Disease: Downy mildew
Pathogen: Peronospora viciae

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source: D.A. Inglis Photo Source: Lyndon Porter
Photo Source: Lyndon Porter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Downy Mildew


Disease: Fusarium root rot
Pathogen: Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi

Fusarium root rot on pea roots (infection from inoculated peas grown in a greenhouse). Root lesions tend to be dark black in color.
Photo Source: Lyndon Porter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Root Rots

See also: Root rot complex caused by mixed infections of Fusarium wilt (FW), Aphanomyces root rot (ARR) and Fusarium root rot (FRR).


Disease: Fusarium wilt
Pathogen: Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Races 1, 5, and 6 of the fungus cause true wilt symptoms; race 2 isolates produce near-wilt symptoms. Races 5 and 6 are economically important in western Washington and southwest British Columbia. Races 1 and 2 reportedly are in all pea-growing regions of Oregon and Washington.

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit Photo Source: Lyndon Porter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Wilt and Near-wilt

See also: Root rot complex caused by mixed infections of Fusarium wilt (FW), Aphanomyces root rot (ARR) and Fusarium root rot (FRR).


Disease: Pea seedborne mosaic
Pathogen: Pea seedborne mosaic virus (PSbMV).
Host Crops: Pea and at least 46 other plant species in 12 families, of which only a few are economically important hosts, including lentil, vetch, chickpea, and pea.

Photo Source:Rebecca McGee Photo Source: Lyndon Porter, USDA-ARS

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Pea Seedborne Mosaic


Disease: Powdery mildew
Pathogen: Erysiphe pisi

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Powdery Mildew

Pea: Powdery mildew, Washington State University Hortsense


Disease: Root rot complex caused by mixed infections of Fusarium wilt (FW), Aphanomyces root rot (ARR) and Fusarium root rot (FRR).
Pathogen: Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi (FW), Aphanomyces euteiches (ARR), and Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (FRR).
Host Crop: Pea

Chlorosis, leading to necrosis, of the lower leaves of pea plants infected with the root rot complex that consists of the pathogens that cause Aphanomyces root rot, Fusarium wilt, and Fusarium root rot. All three diseases alone will cause leaf chlorosis that begins with the lowest leaves on the plant and moves towards the top of the plant. Chlorotic leaves will turn necrotic as the plant matures. Chlorosis of leaves from the bottom of the plant to the top of the plant is most pronounced when Fusarium wilt is involved. Severe infection by Fusarium root rot will stunt the plant but, in general, will not kill the plant. Severe infections by Fusarium wilt or Aphanomyces root rot will generally kill the plants.
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit Photo Source: Lyndon Porter

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Root Rots

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Aphanomyces Root Rot

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Wilt and Near-wilt


Disease: Thielaviopsis root rot
Pathogen: Thielaviopsis basicola
Host Crops: Alfalfa, bean, carrot, corn, pea, pepper and many other plant species.

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit Photo Source: Lyndon Porter Photo Source: Jordan Eggers
Photo Source: Jordan Eggers

Online Resources:

Thielaviopsis Root Rot of Pea, Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Root Rots

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Seed Rot and Damping-off

Emerging and Common Disease Issues in Peas, USDA-ARS.

Root Rots of Pea, University of Illinois Extension.

Nematodes


Disease: Pea cyst nematode
Pathogen: Heterodera goettingiana

Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Pea (Pisum sativum) – Nematode, Cyst


Common name: Root lesion nematode
Latin binomial:  Pratylenchus penetrans
Host crops: Pea and many vegetables/other plant species.

Infrared photo of a pea field infested with root lesion nematodes. Red areas indicate healthy plants. Light-colored areas indicate plants infested with nematodes.
Infrared photo of a pea field infested with root lesion nematodes. Red areas indicate healthy plants. Light-colored areas indicate plants infested with nematodes.
Pea roots infested with root lesion nematodes. Plants have few secondary roots. With development of adventitious roots above the seed piece, plants may survive.
Pea roots infested with root lesion nematodes. Plants have few secondary roots. With development of adventitious roots above the seed piece, plants may survive.
Photo Source:Lindsey du Toit, WSU Photo Source: Lyndon Porter, USDA ARS Photo Source: O & T Images Photo Source: Lyndon Porter, USDA ARS

Online Resources:

Root Lesion Nematodes on Pea, Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest, Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.


Insect/Mite Pests

Common name: Pea moth
Latin binomial:  Cydia nigricana
Host crops: Pea, sweet pea, and vetch

Photo Source: Arthur L. Antonelli, Washington State University Photo Source: Whatcom County, Washington State University Master Gardeners Photo Source: Charlie Streets

Online Resources:

Pea Moth, WSU PLS-59, Washington State University

Pea moth, Pest Spotter, Bayer CropScience

Pea moth, Royal Horticultural Society

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook: Pea, green and dry-Pea moth


Common name: Pea weevil
Latin binomial: Bruchus pisorum
Host crops: Pea (Pisum spp.)

Photo Source: Lyndon Porter, USDA-ARS plant pathologist
Photo Source: Lyndon Porter, USDA-ARS plant pathologist Photo Source: Tim Waters, WSU Extension Educator for Benton/Franklin Counties

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook: Pea, green and dry-Pea weevil

Pea Weevil: Bruchus pisorum(Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), SARDI, Pests and Diseases

Pea Weevil: Bruchus pisorum (Linnaeus), Canadian Grain Commission


Common nameSeedcorn maggot
Latin binomialDelia platura
Host crops: Many vegetable crops including snap, kidney, and lima beansonion, corn, turnip, pea, cabbage, and cucurbits. They cause the most damage in spring to newly emerging seedlings, and can cause severe losses in plant stand.

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

 

Online Resources:

Seedcorn maggot, Vegetable Crop Pests, Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook

Seedcorn Maggot, University of California IPM Pest Management Guidelines, Corn

Seed Corn Maggot, VegEdge, Vegetable IPM Resource for the Midwest, University of Minnesota

Hosts and Pests of Vegetable Crops, Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook


Abiotic Problems

Disease: Adjuvant Damage
Causal Organism/Agent: “In-Place” is a deposition aid and drift management agent added as a tank mix with pesticides to reduce spray drift during applications. The active ingredients of In-Place are modified vegetable oil, aliphatic mineral oil, amine salts of organic acids, and aromatic acid.
Host Crops: Pea.

Photo Source: Lyndon Porter, USDA ARS

Online Resources:

Adjuvant Damage on Pea, Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.


Problem : Edema
A physiological problem most prominent when air is cooler than the soil, soil moisture is high, and relative humidity is high. The low plant transpiration rate combined with an increase in water absorption by roots from the soil leads to increased cell turgor pressure, resulting in eruption of epidermal cells as the inner cells enlarge. Protrusion of the inner cells causes epidermal cells to die and discolor, resulting in a ’warty’ appearance that can be misidentified as a disease. Symptoms are usually worse on lower leaf vs. upper leaf surfaces. Some pea cultivars are more prone to this condition than others.
Host crops: Numerous vegetables including brassicas, cucurbits, pea, spinach, tomato, etc.

Photo Source: Joanne Henderson, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

 

Online Resources:

What are these bumps on my vegetables? Edema or oedema: It doesn’t matter how you spell it, it still doesn’t look good. What is it, what causes it and how can I prevent it? Michigan State University Extension

http://hort.uwex.edu/articles/edema/ University of Wisconsin Extension