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Photo Gallery of Vegetable Problems – Beet


Diseases

Phoma leaf spot and root rot

Powdery mildew

Ramularia leaf spot

Rhizoctonia basal petiole and crown infection

Rust

Scab

Insect/Mite Pests

Aphids

Cutworms

Root aphid

Springtails

Spider mites


(Click on photo to enlarge)

Diseases

Disease: Phoma leaf spot and root rot
Pathogens: Phoma betae (Pleospora betae)
Host crops: Table beet, sugar beet, Swiss chard.

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

 

Online Resources:

http://pnwhandbooks.org/plantdisease/beet-red-beta-vulgaris-phoma-leaf-spot-and-root-rot

 


Disease: Powdery mildew
Pathogens: Erysiphe betae (= E. polygoni or Microsphaera betae)
Host crops: Table beet, sugar beet, Swiss chard

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

 

Online Resources:

http://pnwhandbooks.org/plantdisease/beet-red-beta-vulgaris-powdery-mildew

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r735100611.html

 


Disease: Ramularia leaf spot
Pathogen: Ramularia beticola
Host crops: Most vegetables in the Chenopodiaceae, i.e., sugar beet, table beet, and Swiss chard.

Ramularia leaf spot on Swiss chard leaves.
Photo Source: D.A. Inglis,
Washington State University
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit,
Washington State University

On-Line Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris) – Ramularia Leaf Spot.

 


Disease: Rhizoctonia basal petiole and crown infection
Pathogens: Rhizoctonia
Host crops: Many vegetables are susceptible to infection by Rhizoctonia spp., which are common soilborne fungi. In beet and Swiss chard, these fungi can infect the base of petioles and the crown or main root at or below the soil surface, particularly in moist soil conditions. During very wet conditions, infection can also occur on the leaves.

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

 

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook

 


Disease: Rust
Pathogens:Uromyces betae
Host crops: Table beet

Symptoms of rust on table beet.
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

 

Online Resources:

http://pnwhandbooks.org/plantdisease/beet-red-beta-vulgaris-rust

 


Disease: Scab
Pathogen: Streptomyces scabies

Photo Source: D.A. Inglis

On-Line Resources: 


Insect/Mite Pests

Common namesNumerous aphids can infest vegetable crops, e.g., bean aphid, cowpea aphid, green peach aphid, melon aphid, and potato aphid.
Latin binomial: Numerous types of aphids including Aphis fabae (bean aphid), Myzus persicae(green peach aphid), Aphis gossypii (melon aphid), and Acrosiphum euphorbiae (potato aphid)
Host crops: In addition to beet, cucumber, corn seed, melon, potato, tomato, eggplant and pepper, aphids can feed on many other vegetables including broccoli, cabbage, spinach, Swiss chard, squashpumpkin, as well as many weed species including Brassicaceae (cruciferous) weeds.

Cowpea aphid infesting a table beet seed crop.
Photo Source: Bev Gerdeman, WSU Entomologist

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook: Vegetable crop pests-Aphid

Common Insect & Mite: Aphids, Washington State University Hortsense.

 


Common name: Cutworms

Latin binomial: Various cutworms can feed on beets, e.g., Agrostis ipsilon (black cutworm),Apamea devastator (glassy cutworm), redbacked cutworm (Euxoa ochrogaster), army cutworm (Euxoa auxiliaris), spotted cutworm (Xestica c-nigrum), and variegated cutworm (Peridroma saucia).

Host crops: Wide host range, including many vegetables such as beet (sugar beet, table beet, fodder beet), bean, carrot, onion, spinach, potato, etc. Subterranean species feed on plant roots and stems, cutting the plants at the soil surface. Climbing species are nocturnal, i.e., they hide in the soil during the day and cut off plants at the soil surface or feed on new leaves and stems in the crown.

Photo Source: Bev Gerdeman, Washington State University Entomologist

 

Online resources:

http://insect.pnwhandbooks.org/vegetable-seed/table-beet/table-beet-seed-armyworm-cutworm-and-looper

http://insect.pnwhandbooks.org/legume-grass-field-seed/sugar-beet/sugar-beet-seed-cutworm

 


Common name: Root aphid
Latin binomialPemphigus betaePemphigus populivenae
Host crops: Table beet, sugar beet, Swiss chard

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

Online Resources:

http://insect.pnwhandbooks.org/agronomic/sugar-beet/sugar-beet-sugar-beet-root-aphid

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r735300511.html
Common nameSpringtails (subterranean types)
Latin binomial: Order Collembola. There are numerous types of springtails or collembola, which are divided into two groups – subterranean springtails and surface springtails.
Host crops: Multiple vegetables, but most damage has been reported on spinach and beets, primarily in heavier, organic soils during very wet, cool spring conditions.

A subterranean springtail extracted from soil in a spinach seed crop.
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

On-Line Resources:

Springtails Springtails in Sugarbeet: Identification, Biology, and Management. North Dakota State University, Fargo

Control of Subterranean Springtails in Sugarbeet Using Granular, Liquid, and Seed Treatment Insecticides. North Dakota State University, Fargo

Springtail feeding on emerging crops (especially sugarbeet). Michigan State University

Pest: Springtail. Pest Spotter, Bayer CropScience

Also, see Swiss Chard: Springtails

 


Common nameSpider mites

Latin binomialTetranychus spp. including twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), strawberry spider mite (Tetranychus turkestani), and Pacific spider mite (Tetranychus pacificus)

Host crops: Wide host range, including many vegetables such as bean, carrotspinach,potato, etc.

Severe two-spotted spider mite infestation in a table beet seed crop, with webbing, mites, and eggs on seed stalks.
Photo Source: Bev Gerdeman, WSU Entomologist
Photo Source: Silvia Rondon, Oregon State University

 

Online Resources:

Carrot seed – Twospotted spider mite. PNW Insect Management Handbook, Chapter: Vegetable Seed, Section: Carrot Seed.

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Spider mites.

Managing spider mites in gardens and landscapes. University of California Online Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.