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Photo Gallery of Vegetable Problems – Bean


Diseases

Alfalfa mosaic

Anthracnose

Bean common mosaic

Common bacterial blight

Curly top

Fusarium root rot

Gray mold

Halo blight

Pythium root rot

White mold

Insect/Mite Pests

Seedcorn maggot

Spider mites

Wireworm

Abiotic Problems on Bean

Crumpled leaf

(Click on photo to enlarge)

Diseases

For those of you who work with bean crops of any kind (oilseed, cover, processing, fresh market, seed, forage, etc.), here is important and time-sensitive information from Victor Shaul of the WSDA Seed Program on proposed amendments to bean seed quarantine rules in WA.

Victor Shaul: “First off thank all of you that provided input and took your time coming to meetings on this important topic.

“The public hearing for the changes to the Bean Seed Quarantine was held on July 7th.  Those in attendance were in favor of the proposed changes to the quarantine.  The effective date of these changes is August 21, 2015.
“To re-cap the changes to the quarantine are:

  • Bean seed fields under sprinkler irrigation will require three inspections with the option of laboratory testing for halo blight in lieu of the first inspection.
  • The elimination of the Notice of Intent quarantine reporting form.  This will be replaced with the requirement to attach proof of quarantine compliance with every phytosanitary or certified field inspection application.

“As previously discussed these changes come too late for this season, but I am really pleased at the number of field inspection applications that were submitted for this season that proactively implemented these methodologies.

“These changes will necessitate new application and inspection forms, so that will be an internal winter project and you will be provided with new applications to use at that time.”

Please provide feedback or recommendations to:
Victor Shaul, WSDA Seed Program Manager
vshaul@agr.wa.gov

Further Info:
Proposed Bean Seed Quarantine Rule Amendments


Disease: Alfalfa mosaic
Pathogen: Alfalfa mosaic virus

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Disease: Anthracnose
Pathogen: Colletotrichum lindemuthianum

Photo Source: Krishna Mohan, University of Idaho
Photo Source:
Krishna Mohan,
University of Idaho
 Photo Source:
Karen Ward, WSU Pullman Plant Diagnostician
Photo Source:
Brook Brouwer, Washington State University

On-Line Resources:

Vegetable MD Online: Bean Anthracnose, Cornell University

 


Disease: Bean common mosaic
Pathogen: Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV)

Photo Source: Krishna Mohan,
University of Idaho
Photo Source: Brook Brouwer, Washington State University

Online Resources:

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Bean, All (Phaseolus vulgaris) – Bean Common Mosaic


Disease: Common bacterial blight
Pathogen: Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli
Host crops: Edible beans crops and bean seed crops (including snap beans, lima beans, and dry beans)

Photo Source: Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University

Disease: Curly top
Pathogen: Beet curly top virus (BCTV), vectored by the beet leafhopper Circulifer tenellus
Host crops: Numerous plant species including many vegetables such as bean, beet, carrot,eggplantcoriander, pepper, potatotomato, various cucurbits such as squashcucumber,pumpkinwatermelon, etc.

Photo Source: Phil Hamm  Photo Source: Lindsey J. du Toit Photo Source: Krishna Mohan, University of Idaho

Disease: Fusarium root rotOn-Line Resources:Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Bean, All (Phaseolus vulgaris) – Curly Top

Curly Top Disease of Tomato, Plant Management Network International.

 

Pathogen: Fusarium solani

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Disease: Gray mold
Pathogen: Botrytis cinerea

Photo Source: Carrie H. Wohleb

Disease: Halo blight
Pathogen: Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

Photo Source: D.A. Inglis Photo Source: Carrie Wohleb, WSU Extension Educator,
Grant and Adams Counties

On-Line Resources:

Common Bacterial Blight and Halo Blight: Two Bacterial Diseases of Phytosanitary Significance for Bean Crops in Washington State, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet

Halo Blight of Beans, Identification & Management of Emerging Vegetable Problems in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group.

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Bean, All (Phaseolus vulgaris) – Halo Blight


Disease: Pythium root rot
Pathogen: Pythium species

Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter

Disease: White mold
Pathogen: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
Host crops: Bean, various brassica vegetables, carrot, eggplant, lettucepotatotomato, etc.

Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit Photo Source:
Lyndon Porter
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit
Photo Source: G.Q. Pelter Photo Source:
Krishna Mohan
Photo Source:
Lindsey du Toit
Photo Source:
Jordan Eggers

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: White mold.

Insect/Mite Pests


Disease: Seedcorn maggot
Pathogen: Delia platura
Host Crops: Many vegetable crops including snap, kidney, and lima beans, onion, corn, turnip, pea, cabbage, and cucurbits. They cause the most damage in spring to newly emerging seedlings.

Photo Source: Tim Waters, WSU Extension Educator for Benton and Franklin Counties

Common nameSpider mites
Latin binomialTetranychus spp. including two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), strawberry spider mite (Tetranychus turkestani), and Pacific spider mite (Tetranychus pacificus)
Host crops: Wide host range, including many vegetables such as bean, carrot, potato, etc.

Severe spider mite infestation in an adzuki bean crop.
Note the silvering of the lower leaf surface and white stippling
on the upper surface of some leaves from a very dense population
of spider mites feeding on these leaves.
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University
Photo Source: Silvia Rondon, Oregon State University

 

Online Resources:

http://insect.pnwhandbooks.org/vegetable/vegetable-pests/hosts-and-pests/bean-dry-spider-mite

http://insect.pnwhandbooks.org/vegetable/vegetable-pests/hosts-and-pests/bean-lima-spider-mite

http://insect.pnwhandbooks.org/vegetable/vegetable-pests/hosts-and-pests/bean-snap-spider-mite

See also Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Spider mites.

Common name (of damaging stage): Wireworm (adults are called click beetles or snapping beetles)
Latin binomial: Ctenicera spp. and Limonius spp. Several kinds of wireworms are in the Pacific Northwest. Wireworms causing the most damage in irrigated areas are the Pacific Coast wireworm (Limonius canus), the sugar beet wireworm (L. californicus), the western field wireworm (L. infuscatus), and the Columbia Basin wireworm (L. subauratus). The Pacific Coast and sugar beet wireworms are the most common. Where annual rainfall is <15 inches, the Great Basin wireworm (Ctenicera pruinina) may be a problem, especially when irrigated crops are grown on sagebrush or dry wheat land. This species usually disappears after a few years of irrigation, but may be replaced by Limonius spp. which are favored by moist conditions. West of the Cascades, other wireworm species are pests, including Agriotes spp.
Host crops: All crops are susceptible to wireworm, but this pest is most destructive on beans,carrot, corn, grain, onionpotatoesspinach seed crops, and other annual crops in the PNW.

Photo Source: David Horton, USDA-ARS, Wapato Photo Source:Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University
Photo Source: Oregon State University – Oregon State Arthropod Collection.

 

On-Line Resources:

Pacific NorthwestInsect Management Handbook: Vegetable crop pests – Wireworm

Managing Wireworms in Vegetable Crops. Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food

Wireworms. VegEdge, University of Minnesota.

Wireworms & Click Beetles. Washington State University

Dry beans: Wireworms. UC IPM Online, University of California

Wireworm Field Guide – A guide to the identification and control of wireworms, Syngenta Crop Protection Canada, Inc.

Wireworm Biology and Nonchemical Management in Potatoes in the Pacific Northwest, N. Andrews, M. Ambrosino, G. Fisher, and S.I. Rondon, Pacific Northwest Extension Publication no. PNW607

See Diseases, pests, and other problems common to many vegetables: Wireworm

 

Abiotic Problems on Bean

Common name: Crumpled leaf or LCR
Cause: A genetic disorder or trait called crumpled leaf or LCR caused by an incompatible developmental reaction when beans from different centers of domestication are crossed, e.g., in crosses of Mesoamerican bush blue lake materials with Andean Midwestern types of beans.
Host Crops: Various types of beans resulting from crosses of different races of beans.

Foliar chlorosis and necrosis resulting from a genetic disorder
called crumpled leaf, a genetic trait called crumpled leaf or
LCR caused by an incompatible developmental reaction when beans
from different centers of domestication are crossed, e.g.,
crosses of Mesoamerican bush blue lake materials with Andean
Midwestern types of beans. Symptoms can resemble those caused
by virus infections. Lines with the trait may vary in intensity
of expression, and the expression can vary over the season.
Photo Source: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University

Disease: Alfalfa mosaic
Pathogen: Alfalfa mosaic virus

On-Line Resources: Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Bean, All (Phaseolus vulgaris) – Bean Common Mosaic, Oregon State University


Disease: Anthracnose
Pathogen: Colletotrichum lindemuthianum

On-Line Resources: Vegetable MD Online: Bean Anthracnose, Cornell University


Disease: Bean common mosaic
Pathogen: Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV)

Online Resources: Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Bean, All (Phaseolus vulgaris) – Bean Common Mosaic


Disease: Common bacterial blight
Pathogen: Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli
Host crops: Edible beans crops and bean seed crops (including snap beans, lima beans, and dry beans)

On-Line Resources: Common Bacterial Blight and Halo Blight: Two Bacterial Diseases of Phytosanitary Significance for Bean Crops in Washington State, Washington State University Extension Fact Sheet

Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook: Bean, All (Phaseolus vulgaris) – Common Bacterial Blight {Common Blight}